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Is compassion giving way to anger over homelessness in Southern California?

By in Press Enterprise on October 29, 2017

By Theresa Walker

For Andrea Tabor, running the Neighborhood Watch program at her 332-unit condominium complex means constant vigilance, mostly because of threats — real or otherwise — posed by the area’s homeless.

At 70, Tabor still works full time, but the neighborhood chores she describes sound like a second job.

Routinely, she said, she walks the ungated property in Anaheim, looking for signs of squatters. The e-mail list she updates goes out to some 150 people. She knows local cops by name.

She’s convinced authorities to fence off a railroad area near her complex as a way to keep away the homeless. She regularly urges nearby business owners to do what they can to drive away the homeless.

And, always, Tabor tells her neighbors to call police if they see or experience anything suspicious, particularly related to the homeless.

Tabor didn’t always feel such concern. She said she used to see homeless people and feel badly that they’d been displaced by economic change.

  • Dana Point resident Linda Stiles stands by an abandoned building in July near her apartment. where she says homeless people campout and cause problems. She says her home has been broken into two times in the last three months and has had enough. She is moving to another city. (File photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • A homeless encampment along the Santa Ana Riverbed near the Big A of Angel Stadium. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG file)

    A homeless encampment along the Santa Ana Riverbed near the Big A of Angel Stadium. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG file)

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