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Beyond A Moment Of Silence

By in Huffington Post on June 15, 2017

By LaShawn Warren

This week marks the second anniversary of the horrific murders of Rev. Clementa Pinkney and eight of his parishioners, gunned down by a white supremacist at Mother Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church during bible study in Charleston, South Carolina. The attack remains a painful reminder that America as a nation has yet to reckon with its past, or to meaningfully address the policies and rhetoric that continue to create a culture that allows hate, division, and violence to thrive.

The attack at Emanuel AME was eerily reminiscent of the 1963 white supremacist bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, which killed four African American girls attending Sunday School. Just three years before the attack at Mother Emanuel, a similar hate crime was carried out at another house of worship: a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin. There, a gunman killed six people and wounded four others.

These massacres are particularly heinous because the perpetrators targeted houses of worship — sacred places of peace, solace, love and community for people of faith. But what have we learned from the tragic loss of life in our most sacred spaces? How much more suffering must occur before we learn that more guns will not assuage the social, economic, and cultural issues infecting our country?

How much more suffering must occur before we learn that more guns will not assuage the social, economic, and cultural issues infecting our country?

It is not nearly enough to hold a vigil in remembrance of the victims of such heinous attacks. An authentic effort to honor the lives lost to these and other brutal acts of violence demands transformative policy. It cheapens their memory when we hold a moment of silence, but fail to deal with the underlying social and political ills that fosters a culture […]    

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